What Can You Do With Lenses And What You Should Not Do? Facts And Myths!

Like every product you can ever have, you need to care for it correctly to serve you well. Do damaging things, and you’ll reduce the lifespan of your contact lenses. Do profiting things, and you’ll enjoy your lenses for the longest time.

However, in the quest to find what you should and should not do, some rules have come by as outrageous. One myth for lens care is to keep your contacts in the lens storage case immediately after washing. Yes, it would help if you kept them in the contact case, but that should be after it is air dry.

There are 8 more things you probably didn’t know about how to care for and wear contacts. Therefore, read through this guide, making sure not to skip any part; this article is packed with facts and myths about what you should and should not do with lenses.

Things you can do while wearing contact lenses

The following things might have been ruled out as bad – but aren’t prohibited. Wearing contact lenses should not be a restricting procedure, and you should feel as comfortable as you can while you have them on. Therefore, here are the absolute dos for contact lens wearers.

Wearing Glasses

One common question is, ” Can you wear contact lenses and glasses simultaneously?” The answer is Yes. You definitely can if you feel the need to. While some people use it to treat multiple eye defects, others want the aesthetic offering of their glasses while they have their contact lenses on.

Close your eyes

Many studies have been posted on how dangerous it is to sleep with your contacts. However, some people become scared to close their eyes for a minute. If you are out for the day, get tired, and need to nap, you can.

You don’t have to remove your lenses every minute you wish to take a siesta or a short nap. You should also know that some contact lenses are approved for wearing at night, so you don’t have to remove them before falling asleep.

But you can only sleep while wearing your contacts if your eye doctor approves. Other than that, you might have to remove them.

Wear Makeup

Finally, if you love makeup, you can wear it with your lens. You also don’t have to be limited to the face alone. You can do eye touch-ups, like mascara, eyeliners, and eye shadow. You are good to go if you don’t leave makeup overnight on your face or leave the oils to enter your eye.

8 things you shouldn’t do when wearing contact lenses

Now that you have seen what you CAN do, the following things should be avoided when wearing contact lenses.

Kid Having Eye Doctor Exam

  1. Rub your eyes:

There are three reasons you could rub your eye. It could be out of an itch, from dryness of the eyes, or an unconscious act to do so if the eye feels irritated. However, you should not rub your eyes even if you need to do so. Again, three reasons exist for this.

You could shift the contacts, which will lead to blurred vision, damage your cornea, cause corneal ulcers (which would need a corneal transplant), or instigate additional vision problems. It would help if you visited the eye doctor for eye drops to help reduce irritation.

  1. Fall asleep with your contacts on:

There are two things sleep can do to your contact lens. When you close your eyes for too long, you disallow the lens from getting enough oxygen. You’ll also subject the contact lens to eye infections. As a contact lens wearer, removing contact lenses before sleeping should become a habit.

  1. Cry:

Truly, there are days when things don’t go as planned, and you’ll need to cry. However, the tears and moisture can cause bacterial infection in the eyes. Not being able to clean up the tears (remember that you cannot rub your eyes) might also cause serious infections. So don’t wear contacts if you go to the burial or know you will cry.

  1. Touch contacts with dirty hands:

Touching your lenses with dirty hands poses an increased risk of eye infection. But if you think, ‘my hands are clean; I have not touched any dirty item,’ you might want to look at your hands under a microscope. As long as you have not sanitized your hands at the last minute, your hands are dirty and filled with germs & bacteria of all sorts. Hence, it would be best if you washed your hands before touching your contact lenses at all times.

  1. Cleaning the lens once in a while causes eye infections.

Another thing you should stop is cleaning your contact lenses only a few times. You have to conduct regular and proper cleaning. Cleaning your contact lenses properly and regularly so that you can reduce the number of bacteria that get into the eye. Don’t be tempted to run your contact lenses through tap water.

Water and contacts are not the best of friends since water in itself also contains some bacterial components. Instead, go to your doctor for cleaning prescriptions, or use your contact lens solution.

  1. Shower while wearing lenses

Recall that water and contacts are not friends. Wearing contacts in the bathroom should not be encouraged. Aside from the water increasing the infection risk, the soap can also irritate contact lenses. In the same way, don’t use your contacts in hot tubs, the swimming pool, or the sauna.

  1. Overwearing

Wearing contacts for long periods can cause your eyes to be irritated, dry, itchy, and stressed. You also should not wear lenses for more than they should. Disposable lenses should be worn once and replaced with a fresh pair daily.

  1. Keeping them on even when eyes itch

If you start to feel your eye itch, don’t scratch it. In the same way, you should not keep the lens on for much longer. Remove them immediately. Remember to wash your hands first before touching them. Remove the lenses and put them in the lens storage case. Keeping them on can have adverse effects on your eye health. You should also see a doctor know what went wrong and if your lens (or eyes) needs to be checked.

Top View Of Contact Lenses With Case And Glasses

Conclusion

All in all, there are some situations in which you should avoid wearing contact lenses altogether. These activities would expose your contacts to water, germs, dirt, or sweat, which can pose serious infections to your eyes. They include bathing, swimming, sleeping, biking, and other activities prone to dust.