Coloured Contact Lenses Without a Prescription: 8 Things You Should Know

Planning to buy coloured contact lenses without a prescription? Before purchasing a set of decorative or cosmetic non-prescription contacts, see to it that you totally understand the risks and the factors you need to consider as a buyer. Don’t worry; we’re here to help you with our list of information that can ensure your eyes’ safety and your own satisfaction when you finally decide to order coloured lenses.

8 Things You Should Know about Coloured Contact Lenses Without a Prescription

1. Avoid coloured contact lenses claiming to have a universal size.

The “one size fits all” claim isn’t ideal and you should avoid it at all costs. It’s best to consult a specialist who can properly measure your eyes for that perfect fit with your brand-new coloured contact lenses.

When buying contacts without a prescription, some online stores like Contact Lenses 4 Us still require buyers to pick specific options such as the base curve and diameter to ensure that the product they’re going to buy is the correct choice for their eyes.

What can you expect during consultation and examination? The specialist will measure your cornea’s curvature with a keratomater. The cornea is the exact spot where a lens should be placed. Knowing your corneal curvature is enough to identify the proper base curve and diameter for your contacts.

2. Wearing the wrong fit can harm your eyes.

We’re not just talking about a mere itch or mild pain. Coloured contact lenses that are too big or too small for your cornea can significantly affect your eye health.

The first possible consequence of choosing the incorrect size of coloured contacts is “pink eye”, technically called conjunctivitis. The level of discomfort you can get from this type of infection is serious. It can cause excessive discharge, severe redness, and unbearable itch. On the bright side, pink eye is normally treatable and temporary.

As for the worse consequences, if you settle for the wrong fit, the long-term result is poor vision. Ultimately, it might result in permanent blindness if you just keep on tolerating frequent discomfort caused by wearing coloured contact lenses with the wrong specifications.

3. Consult a specialist even if you think you have perfect vision.

If you’re thinking of buying coloured contacts without a prescription because you’re confident about your seemingly flawless vision, that’s actually very risky. What if you have an underlying eye or health condition?

Your eyes should undergo a meticulous examination whether you have perfect vision or not. You might need some sort of vision correction, hence the eye doctor requiring you a special set of coloured contact lenses. Some coloured contacts are more stunning than others, and it’s such a delight to know that they can come in higher or lower power levels for people with astigmatism, nearsightedness, or farsightedness.

4. Coloured contacts still require great care even if they’re only decorative.

This is crucial, especially if the coloured contact lenses only require monthly replacement. Monthly contacts need regular maintenance, which also means that the entire cleaning and storage process should be extremely hygienic.

You should also use the appropriate items and substances, specifically the container or case and the contact solution (some disinfecting and storage solutions are sold separately but there’s such thing as multipurpose solutions as well).

The daily disposable type, despite the fact that it doesn’t need any cleaning and storage at all, also requires careful handling. You must focus on proper insertion and removal to avoid abrasion on your cornea. And, of course, your hands should be thoroughly washed and dried before touching the lenses, including the storage case.

5. Head to your eye doctor once you notice certain signs and symptoms.

Feeling any kind of discomfort when you’re wearing a pair of coloured contact lenses for the first time is normal. However, that shouldn’t be the case for several days. If you’re experiencing pain in your eyes that won’t go away for a week at most, that’s possibly a symptom of an infection.

Severe redness is a big no-no as well. As for the worst symptom a first-time user can experience, it’s their vision quality changing in a bad way.

6. Consider your natural eye colour.

This tip is based on the two major variations of coloured contact lenses: the enhancer and the opaque type. Coloured contacts with an enhancement tint are best for lighter or brighter eye colours like grey and blue. On the other hand, opaque lenses are more stunning when they’re on darker irises, especially the ones with a black or brown colour.

You have all the freedom in the world to choose the lens colour you really want regardless of your natural eye colour. Just remember that some coloured lenses can’t totally change the colour of your eyes. That’s mainly because of their tint and your natural eye colour not complementing each other perfectly.

7. Pay attention to the type of tint added to the contact lenses.

Just because you saw the word “tint” on the product description doesn’t automatically mean that you’re looking at a pair of coloured contact lenses. Aside from the enhancement and opaque tints, there’s also another major type and it’s called the visibility tint.

Visibility tints have a pale green or blue colour that’s won’t change your eyes’ appearance at all. Their sole purpose is to make the lens more visible in its container and on your finger for easier handling.

8. Coloured contact lenses with unusual designs for costumes are totally safe.

No matter how outrageous the colours and patterns are on a single lens, this special type of coloured contacts is 100% safe as long as it’s not a fake product and the brand or manufacturer is credible. It only becomes dangerous if it’s worn longer than necessary and if you’re handling it carelessly.

Just like the usual reminders you get if you’re wearing standard contact lenses, don’t ever sleep with your coloured contacts on unless they’re designed for 24/7 use. Also, make sure your hands are cleaned thoroughly with soap and water. Lastly, keep the lens case clean without washing it with water. Use a contact solution instead.